How often do you receive praise or recognition at work? We’ve had bosses that expressed gratitude well and bosses that never did it.

To understand the impact of expressed gratitude, let’s look at three common types: praise, recognition, and validation.

By praise, I mean the communication of appreciation for a person’s ideas, efforts, or contributions. Expressing praise can be as simple as writing or emailing a thank you note or calling a person up to thank them verbally.

Praise has the least beneficial, sustained impact of the three types. It is typically one-way communication – from you to the receiver. It is often a simple expression of thanks without delving into the actions you are praising or the benefits of their actions.

Praise is better than no communication of gratitude, but there are better ways to inspire.

In today’s 4-minute culture leadership charge video episode, Chris shares the benefits of recognition and validation, and directs leaders to leverage the positive impact of only one of these two types.

This is episode eighty-six of Chris’ Culture Leadership Charge video series. In these concise videos, Chris presents the best practices for creating and maintaining a purposeful, positive, productive culture – at work, at home, and in your community.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my YouTube and my iTunes channels. If you like what you see or hear, please subscribe!

Have you responded to this month’s culture leadership poll? Add your perspective to two questions – it’ll take you less than a minute. Then click the “results” link to see what others from around the globe think!

Photo © Adobe Stock – Michael Jung. All rights reserved.

S. Chris Edmonds

S. Chris Edmonds

Chris helps leaders create purposeful, positive, productive work cultures. He's a speaker, author, and executive consultant. He blogs, podcasts, and video casts. He is the author of The Culture Engine and six other books.
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